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Our budget tool has changed

  • Using our new budget tool will make sure you have a budget you can easily use to help you deal with your debts.
  • If you have done a budget with us before, you can still see it here and make changes but only for a limited time. Our advice is to do a new budget using our tool below so you have the most up to date type of budget to help you with your debts.
  • Our new tool has been improved based on user-feedback and can be used on a mobile phone. It has also been approved by the Money Advice Service as meeting the new Standard Financial Statement guidelines.

Welcome to your budget

What to do

Please fill in the following details before you download your budget sheet either as a full or summary PDF.

The information in Your personal details will not be saved and will need to be re-entered if you load the budget.

If you have a partner, only add their details here if you are dealing with your debts together.

If you're having trouble filling in this section, watch this video

Your full name
Your date of birth
Is your budget sole or joint with a partner?
What is your employment status?
What type of accommodation do you live in?
Your address line 1
Your address line 2
Your address line 3
Postcode
Do you have a partner who lives with you?
Number of dependent children under 16
Number of dependent children aged 16-18
Other dependants
Non-dependants
Number in household
Number of vehicles in household

Earnings

If you live with your partner and you are not dealing with your debts together, contact us for advice about completing this section.

Take home pay means your wages and salary after deductions for tax, National Insurance, pension contributions and anything else that is taken straight for your wages.

Only include overtime payments if you receive these on a regular basis.

If you are having money deducted from your wages to pay a debt, for example, for council tax or child maintenance arrears, contact us for advice.

If you're having trouble filling in this section, watch this video

Amount

How often?

Your salary or wages (take home)
Your partner's salary or wages (take home)
Other

Benefits and Tax credits

If you are on a low income, you may be entitled to benefits that you are not claiming. If you are sick or disabled, you may be able to claim a range of disability benefits. Contact us for advice.

If money is being taken directly from your benefits to repay debts, for example rent or council tax arrears, contact us for advice.

Amount

How often?

Universal Credit
Jobseeker's Allowance (income based)
Jobseeker's Allowance (contribution based)
Income Support
Working Tax Credit
Child Tax Credit
Child Benefit
Employment and Support Allowance or Statutory Sick Pay
Disability benefits
Carer's Allowance
Local Housing Allowance/Housing Benefit
Council Tax support
Other

Pensions

Amount

How often?

State Pensions
Private or work pensions
Pension Credit
Other

Other income

Amount

How often?

Maintenance or child support
Boarders or lodgers
Non-dependants' contributions
Student loans and grants
Other

Assets are things like savings or the value of property, such as your home or car. Creditors will not usually expect you to sell these to pay off your debts, but it is a good idea to show that you have at least considered whether this is an option. By clicking yes here, you are confirming that you have no assets that you can sell to make lump-sum payments to pay off your debts. This statement will appear on your budget. If you are thinking about using any of your assets to pay off your debts, you may have other options. Contact us for advice.

If you're having trouble filling in this section, watch this video

I confirm that I have no assets that I can use to make lump-sum payments

Include all your outgoings. If you live with a partner and you are not dealing with your debts together, contact us for advice before completing this section.

If your spending in some areas seems to be higher than average, you will see a pop-up box at the end of the section telling you this. Use the space in the pop-up box to explain the reason to your creditors. This statement will appear in your budget. You can go back to your statement and change it if you need to."

If you're having trouble filling in this section, watch this video

Home and contents

Amount

How often?

Rent
Ground rent and service charges (factor fees if you live in Scotland)
Mortgage
Mortgage endowment
Secured loans
Council tax/rates (including water charge if you live in Scotland and rates in NI)
Appliance and furniture rental (including appliance and furniture HP, conditional sale and so on)
TV licence
Other

Utilities

Amount

How often?

Gas
Electricity
Other costs (including coal, oil and calor gas)
Other

Water

Amount

How often?

Water supply
Water waste

Care and health costs

Amount

How often?

Childcare costs
Adult-care costs
Child maintenance or child support
Prescriptions and medicines
Dentistry and opticians
Other

Transport and travel

Amount

How often?

Public transport (e.g. work, school, shopping)
Hire purchase or conditional sale vehicle
Car insurance
Road tax
MOT and ongoing maintenance
Breakdown cover
Fuel, parking and toll road charges
Other

School costs

Amount

How often?

School uniform
After-school clubs and school trips
Other

Pensions and insurances

Amount

How often?

Pension payments
Life insurance
Mortgage payment protection insurance
Buildings and contents insurance
Health insurance (medical, accident or dental)
Other

Professional costs

Amount

How often?

Professional courses
Union fees
Professional fees
Other

Other essential costs

Amount

How often?

Magistrates' court or sheriff court fines

Include all your outgoings. If you live with a partner and you are not dealing with your debts together, contact us for advice before completing this section.

If your spending in some areas seems to be higher than average, you will see a pop-up box at the end of the section telling you this. Use the space in the pop-up box to explain the reason to your creditors. This statement will appear in your budget. You can go back to your statement and change it if you need to.

If you're having trouble filling in this section, watch this video

Communications and leisure

Amount

How often?

Home phone, internet, TV package (inlcuding film subscriptions)
Mobile phone
Hobbies, leisure or sport (e.g. socialising, eating out, outings, clubs, leisure courses)
Gifts (e.g. birthdays, festivals, charity donations)
Pocket money
Newspapers, magazines, stationery and postage
Other

Important

Your expenditure on communications and leisure seems higher than average. Check your figures and if they are accurate it is important that you tell your creditors the reason why your spending is higher in this area (enter this information in the box below).

Food and housekeeping

Amount

How often?

Groceries (e.g. food, pet food, non-alcoholic drinks, cleaning)
Nappies and baby items
School meals and meals at work
Laundry
Alcohol
Smoking products
Vet bills and pet insurance
House repairs and maintenance
Other

Important

Your expenditure on food and housekeeping seems higher than average. Check your figures and if they are accurate it is important that you tell your creditors the reason why your spending is higher in this area (enter this information in the box below).

Personal costs

Amount

How often?

Clothing
Hairdressing
Toiletries
Other

Important

Your expenditure on personal costs seems higher than average. Check your figures and if they are accurate it is important that you tell your creditors the reason why your spending is higher in this area (enter this information in the box below).

You can include an amount towards savings in your budget as long as this is 10% or less of the money you have left over for creditors. The most you can save is £20 a month altogether. For example, if you have £100 a month available you can save £10 a month. If you have £250 a month available you can save £20.

See our budgeting and saving fact sheet for information about savings.

If you're having trouble filling in this section, watch this video

Amount

Please confirm that a monthly contribution to savings has been considered (or discussed with an adviser)
Potential monthly savings amount
Tick here to opt-out of the savings contribution

List all of the priority debts that you have and any payments that you have agreed to make. Priority creditors have stronger powers to get their money back than non-priority creditors, and so must be dealt with first. Look at the list below for the main priority debts. For more information about dealing with priority debts, see Step 3 of Dealing with your debts.

If you're having trouble filling in this section, watch this video

Total you owe

Agreed monthly repayment

List all your non-priority debts here. These are debts where the creditor hasn't got extra powers to make you pay (for example, they cannot take your home). This means these debts can usually be treated differently to priority debts. Common non-priority debts include credit cards, unsecured personal loans, bank and building society overdrafts, and catalogues. For more information about dealing with non-priority debts, see Step 4 of Dealing with your debts.

If you're having trouble filling in this section, watch this video

Total you owe

This is the total amount you owe each creditor.

Monthly offer

Your budget will calculate your monthly offer to each creditor.

£0

£0

You could offer a token payment of £1 per month to each of your creditors. This may only be a short-term solution but it can give you some time to work out your other options.

Use this space to tell your creditors anything else that you think they might need to know.

Important!

It is recommended that the budget is completed in order, make sure you have completed the Your household section before continuing.

Information!


Information!

Load budget sheet

Use your username and password to load a budget you have previously saved. Please note that if you have started a new budget and load a previous one, this will overwrite your new information.

Username:
Password:

Save budget sheet

To save your budget so you can come back and make changes, create an account by clicking on the register button below.

If you already have an account, you will need to log in to save your budget.

Use the username and password given to you at the time of creation to load your budget

Username:
Password:

Account created

A new account has been created with your budget form data. Please make a note of your login details so that you can access your data again in the future.

Username: Password:

If you would like us to email you these details please enter your email address below. We will not store this email address.

Email address:

Download budget sheet

You can download a PDF of your budget summary to send to your creditors. A budget summary is a less detailed version of your full budget that gives creditors all the information they need.

Make sure you fill in the Your personal details section of the budget before you download your budget summary. Your creditors need to see this information.


You can download a PDF of your full budget too. This may be useful to keep track of your spending.

What do I do now?

Doing a budget helps you understand the options you have for dealing with your debts. See our fact sheet Ways to deal with your debt or watch our Next steps video to see what to do next.

Make sure you save your budget first so you can come back to it. Use the Save button.


If you want to print out a copy of your full budget or your budget summary, use the Download button.